Honest Qwantify Review – Qwantify Scam? Is Qwantify a Scam?

Honest Review of Qwantify – Is Qwantify a Scam?

I was doing my usual about a month ago as in looking for a viable online business opportunity when I came across a company named Qwantify.

Qwantify is a Shopify website development company claims that they will build you, the client, a “niche Shopify drop shipping store and get that store to $10,000 per month in gross revenue within a 3-6 month timeframe. 

I’ll admit I was intrigued but skeptical at the same time. “Why would a company that has the ability to create niche six figure a year Shopify drop shipping stores not simply create the sites for themselves?” I asked myself over and again.

Admittedly, my first thought with regard to Qwantify is that it must be a scam.

I did a reverse search on the Qwantify.com domain name and discovered that the domain was registered in 2004. However, this information was not helpful in the least.

I did a search on Google of, “Qwantify Reviews” and not much appeared. 

I decided to conduct some further research and headed over to YouTube where I again used the search term, “Qwantify Review.”

The results showed a marketing video from Qwantify as well as what appeared to be a celebrity endorsement from none other “Mr. Wonderful” Kevin O’Leary from Shark Tank.

Best Qwantify Review and shout out yet!

Why would a person as well known as Kevin O’Leary provide such a positive review of a company that I felt was a scam? If it the Qwantify was a scam why would he associate himself with Qwantify?

I’m no longer confused but was confused at this point in time and decided my best course of action was to fill out the contact form and await a response.

That day I received a voice mail message and a text message from a person at the company.

I called her back and scheduled a discovery call with a sales representative, Drew, from Qwantify for the following week.

Quantify Review – Breaking Down the Costs of the Qwantify Opportunity

There is a one time fee that needs to be paid that allows you to get started with Qwantify. 

Qwantify states that the expected time frame to get my Shopify store to the $10,00 gross revenue mark will take between 3 and 6 months. However, if the $10,00 gross revenue mark goes beyond 6 months they will continue to tweak the site in order to get my site to that $10,000 gross revenue bench mark.

It doesn’t matter if it takes 3 months or 9 months to get to store to the $10,000 gross revenue mark as the agreement between myself and Qwantify would be for a 12 month period. 

In addition to the one time Qwantify also charges a 10% monthly fee taken from your net profit.

I was also by told by Drew that once the site is launched revenue will be generated just not at the benchmark.

Below is a summary of the two aspects of working with Qwantify:

  • Qwantify fee 
  • Qwantify residual monthly fee 

As this would be a drop shipping business based upon the niche agreed upon between me and Qwantify, products need to be purchased. I was told that the expected profit margin would be at anywhere between 50% and 65%. In other words, Qwantify gets my drop shipping Shopify store to $10,000 per month in gross revenue and my expected net profit should be $5,00 and $6,500 per month.

Quantify Review – What Happens When Quantify Achieves the $10,000 Gross Revenue Mark?

I was told by Drew that once Qwantify achieves the guaranteed $10,000, again between 3-6 months, gross revenue mark I they would continue to work with me for a total of 12 months.

After 12 months I would have two options. 

Option #1 – As I would have been trained to properly operate my Shopify store I could end my relationship with Qwantify at that time. I could take over the entire business and take care of customer service, marketing and advertising. On other words become the webmaster of the site.

Option #2 – I could continue to continue to utilize Qwantify’s services for a combined fee of a set monthly price as well as a percentage of my net revenue.

I couldn’t wrap my mind over one glaring issue that I had.

If I had the ability to create successful niche Shopify drop shipping online stores and achieve a minimum of $10,000 in monthly gross sales why wouldn’t I create site after site for myself?

When I asked this very question to Drew, I was provided with an answer of,

“Qwantify is about helping entrepreneurs become financially successful. We could of course do this on our own but we wouldn’t be helping anyone other than ourselves. We’re entrepreneurs who help aspiring entrepreneurs.”

I appreciate a great sales line but I still couldn’t wrap my head around it.

“The service seems great but what is the fee to work with Qwantify I asked”

Qwantify Review – How much is the Qwantify One Time Fee

“The fee to work with Qwantify is $47,000,” he answered.

“I don’t know, I need time” I replied.

We scheduled a date and time for a follow up call, ended the call and the sales representative emailed me with the following: 

How Keith from Qwantify Helps His Partners Grow Their Drop-Shipping Business to $10k+/Month within 12 months from Anna Zheng on Vimeo.

I again went through all of the above and read the sample service agreement over and again. In black and white there it was, a guarantee that Qwantify will get the site to $10,000 per month in gross sales.

In addition I was provided with three references that provided a name to go along with their email addresses.

I still couldn’t wrap my head around my issue of, “If I had the ability to create successful niche Shopify drop shipping online stores and achieve a minimum of $10,000 in monthly gross sales why wouldn’t I create site after site for myself instead of charging $47,000 and a 10% of monthly net revenue?”

Combining my issue with a the one time fee was enough for me to email my sales representative stating I was no longer interested.

Checking Qwantify References

Over the next month I kept researching business opportunities as I often do but I couldn’t stop thinking about Qwantify.

A couple of days ago I was home on an off day as my wife worked from home and my son played video games online with his friends.

I opened a beer, poured my beer into a pint glass and opened the email the Qwantify sales representative.

I’ve never had a person or a company provide a bad reference but I felt I should at least make an attempt to speak with at least one of the references my Qwantify sales representative provided.

I emailed all three references and was shocked when each and everyone of them responded asking me for my phone number and what time I would be able to speak. Then again, I shouldn’t have been shocked as most people are at home in quarantine over Covid-19 as I was.

As I did not ask permission from any of the references, from an ethics standpoint I won’t divulge their names, the links to their Qwantify Shopify Drop Shipping stores or what market niche their operating in.

I did speak to each person for close to an hour.

What I Learned From Qwantify Reference One (1)

A fellow New Yorker who lives in the city. He has a background in ecommerce and felt that the fee was reasonable enough from a time perspective.

He admitted that he could have done most of the work himself but as it would take him away from his other businesses he pulled the trigger.

At month three (3) when he was about to launch, one of the social media sites changed their marketing guidelines pushing his launch date back by a month.

By month seven (7) his Qwantify site was passed the $10,000 gross revenue mark. He’s now heading into month nine (9) with Qwantify and won’t be utlizing them after the 12 month agreement expires. He’s either going to operate the site on his own or possibly hire someone to run it for him.

He told me that the company is legitimate and if I had the money to invest it would be a no brainer.

What I Learned From Qwantify Reference Two (2)

A very nice woman who lives in New Jersey. She and her husband had brick and mortar stores that they sold and they both invest in real estate flips.

I told her how skeptical I was about Qwantify. When she laughed and told me she had felt the same way it made me full much better than I had.

She told me that she was so skeptical she had her friend, a litigation attorney, check the company out and also had him review the agreement.

“He was angry that he couldn’t find any dirt on the company. He also told me the agreement was pretty standard.”

I beleive I spent over and hour talking to her. I learned that her Qwantify site had been launched in October of 2018 and after her 12 month agreement she continued to have Qwantify operate her site. It took Qwantify around 7 months to get the site to the $10,000 gross sales mark and told me that the website has leveled out a bit but steadily generates on average, $11,500 per month in gross revenue at a 65% profit margin.

She told me that deciding to work wit Qwantify was one if not the best business decision she’s made. So much so that she’s about to utilize Qwantify to build a second website for her.

What I Learned From Qwantify Reference Three (3)

An awesome guy who lives in Philadelphia who works from home as a sales person.

He told me he’s been with Qwantify for three (3) years and was one of the first clients to sign on board.

“When I started with them I didn’t have references to call so I spoke to the CEO before I pulled the trigger,” he told me.

He told me he recouped his entire investment in eighteen (18) months and the last (18) months has been nothing but profit.

I was stunned when he told me that his site steadily generated $18,000 per month in gross revenue but that his profit margin fluctuates from 50% to 65% depending on the time of month and what products sell the best in a given month. Again depending on the month, net income is between $7,000 to $9,000 per month.

As reference two (2) told me, he too is going to be opening a second site with Qwantify. He’s also getting two of his mutual friends into a partnership so they too can have a Qwantify site. 

He was nice enough to give me advice. 

“Pull the trigger and stay at your job until the site you recoup your investment. Don’t touch any of the profit the site makes…just bank it and save for a second site. Once you recoup the cost of the second site and it too is profitable, you can leave your job and make a ton of money doing nothing.”

He too has Qwantify running his site although he does do a little customer service from time to time by replying to emails and damaged product complaints.

Qwantify Review – Red Flags

Qwantify – Red Flag #1

I was provided with references but no sales person in the right mind provides a bad reference. I knew this having spent a decade as a sales professional. I wasn’t expecting to hear anything bad and of course didn’t.

However, of the three references I spoke with, two provided me with their cell phone numbers. One called from a private number.

Why a private number?

I could be as simple as the reference only wanting to have a one time conversation with me but it could also be because if I went ahead and made the investment with Quantify and it went bad I couldn’t hold that reference liable.

It could be one or the other but having one reference not provide me with a phone number and call me from a private number raised red flag number one (#1).

Qwantify Red Flag #2

After speaking with the references my interest grew. Here were three people who verified everything that I was told by, Drew.

I emailed Drew that I was still interested and would like for him to contact me so we could discuss the Qwantify opportunity further.

My email went unanswered!

I understood that I had emailed him stating I was no longer interested but I did reach out expressing interest again.

I am once again a prospect yet I don’t deserve another conversation?

Again, as a person who was a sales professional I found this to be odd. 

As Drew hadn’t contacted me I decided to call into Qwantify and scheduled a call with another sales person, Raj.

Qwantify Review – My conversation with Rarj of Qwantify

I had a few questions for Rarj but they were what I felt to be questions that I needed to have answered before considering paying a company $47,000 of my hard earned money.

I had crunched the numbers over and again and the numbers looked promising. 

Combine promising numbers and logical answers to my questions and Rarj could potentially make a sale.

Truth be told, I looked forward to my sales call.

My questions are in bold, Rarj’s answers in normal text.

  • Is each niche exclusive to each client? Yes!
  • What are my responsibilities with regard to marketing? None, we handle all of it.
  • Is there a discount for future projects? Yes.
  • Does Qwantify employ or outsource? Employ and only outsource if we’re too busy. 
  • What is the average profit margin for Qwantify clients? 60%
  • What is the range of an average clients Shopify stores gross revenue? $16,000-$22,000.
  • How many managed account client accounts does Qwantify have? 140.
  • What are my monthly recurring costs? A couple of hundred dollars…around $200.
  • What are the fees for Qwantify to manage my account after 12 months? $2,000 per month and 10% of net profit.

During my conversation with Rarj he told me that Qwantify has a company mission.

Do good for others and others will do good for you. In other words Karma.

That most of his customers are by referral and at the end of the day Qwantify not only makes money but helps others makes money. A win on both sides of the fence.

That Qwantify is making millions of dollars per month and that there was a particular client that was netting an income of over $400,000 through 5 Qwantify Shopify sites.

Raj was articulate, come across as passionate and had an immediate answer for each of my questions.  He even told me that he invested in his own Qwantify site and even texted me a link to it.

I told him I needed 1 day to think things over and conduct additional research. We scheduled a follow up call for the following day.

More Red Flags on Qwantify 

 

I don’t know how you feel but I feel that $47,000 is a large sum of money. 

There is no way that I would invest $200 in anything let alone $47,000 without verifying as much information that both Drew and Raj provided to me.

We live in an age of readily available free information known as the internet. 

If you know how to use the internet and the sources to trust, research can be completed both quickly easily. 

Red flags multiplied quickly!

Q & A – “How many managed account client accounts does Qwantify have? 140

I had no way of verifying the above but logic states that I should be able to locate most of the sites.

As all Qwantify sites use the same customer service number I searched the number online and found 25 Qwantify sites as of this posting. 

I was more shocked than impressed as by simply looking at certain sites that there as no way that those sites were earning any revenue.

Q & A – What is the range of an average clients Shopify store? $16,000-$22,000.

Answer = I don’t believe this to be true after locating the Qwantify sites that I found.

Here are just two examples: This site generates between $16,000-$22,000 per month?

How about this one?

Q & A – Does Qwantify employ or outsource? I was told that 95% of the work is completed in house as they have hundreds of employees but when things get to busy some of the work is outsourced.

I used the following 

Qwantify LinkedIn Company Page

4 people are located in the United States, 3 in Canada, 3  in the UK and 2 in London. Of the 11 people associated with Qwantify I found both sales people, Drew & Raj are associated with  Closers Club!

Closers Club is a company located in the UK that specializes in high ticket sales.

My first sales person Drew has both Closers Club and Qwantify posted on his profile page as does my other sales representative Raj.

I can see why as both specialize in closing high ticket sales and Qwantify is a high ticket sale at $47,000.

However, if partners in Qwantify are spread out from the United States to the other side of he pond in London what are the chances that the employ a staff of hundreds?

I decided to find the Qwantify corporate address that is posted on their website. 

I could only shake my head as I discovered that the Qwantify corporate office is located in an executive suite.

An executive suite are smaller office spaces that share amenities such as lobbies, reception areas, receptionist personnel, conference room and break rooms. The business owner is able to rent less space for an office and use the included common areas.

Many companies choose to use executive suites but in the case of Qwantify I felt it to be unsettling. 

When I was told that Qwantify has hundreds of employees I pictured a large office space filled with programmers, account executives and marketing people.

In that Qwantify operates from an executive suite leads me to believe that the business model relies on outsourcing. In my opinion when a company relies on outsourcing they lose a large portion of their control.

TrustPiltot.com review of Qwantify.
Response from Keith Lynch of Qwantify

The CEO of Qwantify, Keith Lynch replies, “I wouldn’t post a Yelp review about a restaurant that I’ve never actually dined in – that is odd.”

What I find odd is Mr. Lynch’s reply.

The reviewer was obviously interested in working with Qwantify and decided to share his finding on that website as I am doing here on my blog.

“Nonetheless, thanks for your opinion, I guess? I hope that you find an opportunity to review that you actually paid a client someday,” Mr. Lynch ends his response with.

Not once in his reply did he address the reviewers concern that the Qwantify sites that were provided to the reviewer by his company appeared to be non operation?

I was told that Qwantify has 140 managed account clients with an average gross revenue of between $16,000 and $22,000.

I would think that more than a handful would be ecstatic to provide a video testimonial that Qwantify could use in their marketing efforts but as of this posting I can’t find one.

If I was a Qwantify client and through our relationship I was earning even $50,000 a year from the site I would probably provide a video testimonial on my own without having to be asked. 

The testimonial on the top is posted on the success page on Qwantify.com. and the testimonial below it is posted on TrustPilot.com.

You’ll notice that the reviewer had on TrustPilot.com review and now has an additional 2 reviews.

One review for a site Europe-Pharma.com and for Cillo.dk.

I don’t believe that the woman with a name of Pamala Cowherd used either of the above websites yet I’m to believe she is a Qwantify customer?

 

 

Qwantify Review – The BIGGEST Red Flag

When I spoke to all three references I also obtained the domain names for each of their Qwantify managed Shopify stores.

What I discovered left me close to speechless.

Successful websites of any kind rely primarily one one major thing which is traffic.

Qwantify states that the traffic to my Shopify website will be attained through pay per click advertising as well as social media advertising.

If Qwantify is going to do this for me they should have already done so for others, especially for the references who provided me with earnings claims.

If a successful website has little traffic and no advertisements on the most popular social media site for advertising for any of the websites how much revenue is being generated?  

Granted, it is possible that their sites convert so well that the amount of traffic needed is minimal but this is in opposition and conflict with what I know to be factual about ecommerce.

Honest Review of Qwantify – Answering the question of “Why would a company that has the ability to create niche six figure a year Shopify drop shipping stores not simply create the sites for themselves?”

Numbers don’t lie and the math doesn’t.

I’m gong to break this down as easily as I can.

  • The one time Qwantify fee is $47,000.
  • Qwantify earns 10% of your net revenue.
  • Alleged gross revenue is between $16,000 & $22,000 or median of $19,000.
  • Average profit margin is 60%. 
  • After 12 months Qwantify bills $2,000 per month + 10% of net monthly profits.

Example client store:

  • Generates $19,000 per month in gross sales.
  • Profit margin of 60%

Qwantify client math: 

  • $19,000 in gross sales x 60% profit margin = $11,400
  • $11,400 minus (-) $2,000 for the Qwantify managed account fee = $9,400
  • $11,400 minus (-) 10% of net profit = $1,140
  • Monthly net profit of the store = $8,260
  • Yearly net profit = $99,120

Qwantify client profit:

  • $2,000 fee for managed account
  • $1,140 monthly at 10%
  • Profit of $3,140 per month
  • Profit of $37,680 per year

As the owner of the company why would I chose to earn $37,680 per year when I could earn $136,800 per year?

Even when taking the $47,000 on time fee into account to the yearly profit of $37,680 my total profit on this client is $84,680 which means I still lost $51,120.

I watched the entire video interview with Keith Lynch in which he clearly states that when he opened the company, all the sites were created for in house purposes. That his company would operate and sell the sites for a profit as they still do but not as many.

If the company was profitable in the business of creating sites, making them profitable and selling them for a profit why abandon the business model to make less revenue?

Earlier in this post I stated,

“Why would a person as well known as Kevin O’Leary provide such a positive review of a company that I felt was a scam? If it the Qwantify was a scam why would he associate himself with Qwantify?

I’m no longer confused but was confused at this point in time and decided my best course of action was to fill out the contact form and await a response.”

If you watch the video and pay close attention not once does Kevin O’Leary state that he recommends Qwantify, has used Qwantify or knows anyone that has used Qwantify.

He summarizes what Qwantify does and says to check them out which is exactly what I did.

Qwantify Review – Answering the Question “Is Qwantify a Scam?”

I will not become a Qwantify client.

Am I not becoming a Qwantify client as I believe Qwantify to be a scam?

I cannot state with certainty if Qwantify is a scam or not but will state that based on my experience in talking with their sales people in combination with my online research that I will not be parting with my $47,000.

Business relationships as well as personal relationships are based on trust.

As such, I don’t have comfortable level of trust that would allow me to become a business partner with Qwantify. 

The purpose of this review was to share my experience and research with regard to Qwantify not to state that Qwantify is a scam or not.

This review is based upon my own independent research but will through out a challenge in the unlikely scenario that Qwanitfy Inc. happens to land on this review.

Qwantify Challenge

Show me actual real time earnings from at least 3 Qwantify managed client sites.

A simple GoToMeeting screen share would be easy to do, not showing account passwords is easily done and all my challenges can be met.

If your company has 140 managed client accounts, all of who are making money, getting 3 clients to agree to allow you to show their account earnings information for demonstration purposes shouldn’t be difficult.

Show me actual real time advertisements for Qwantify client managed accounts.

I won’t click on any of the advertisements.

I only want to see that advertisements exist.

Show me traffic statistics for the same Qwantify client managed accounts.

Google analytics or Shopify statistics will show me all I need to know.

Do all of the above, prove me wrong and I will not only admit that I was 100% wrong by updating this review but I will also become a client.

Honest Qwantify Review – What Do You Think?

Based on your own research as well as my research do you believe Qwantify to be a scam?

Has my blog post of helped you to make a decision to work or not work with Qwantify?

Are you or do you know a happy Qwantify client?

Please post your comments below and I hope you enjoyed my Qwantify review.

Additional Red Flags on Qwantify. 

Feel free comment below but I strongly suggest watching the below video as I address 4 additional red flags I didn’t address in the above Qwantify review.

 


34 thoughts on “Honest Qwantify Review – Qwantify Scam? Is Qwantify a Scam?

  1. Raja

    Anthony,
    Thank you for providing such a thorough review and analysis. It makes a lot of sense. Your review helps people who are researching about Qwantify to ask the right questions. I enjoyed reading your review and appreciate you taking time to do such a wonderful job.

    Thank you

    Reply
    1. Anthony Post author

      Raja,

      I’m glad you enjoyed my Qwantify review and I thank you for your kind words.

      Reply
  2. Bethany Johnson

    I am not sure if you did your math right. I know from one of the people I was referred to that the end of year contract to have Qwantify continue developing the site is optional. So rather than making 47k you could make the 100k or however it is you calculated. Also, I assumed Keith makes other people sites because it’s a smarter business strategy. He can generate a profit much faster charging 47k per person per month at the goal of ten people per month than if he generated ten websites per month at the cost of paying 150 employees.

    Reply
    1. Anthony Post author

      Yes, he can generate a profit much faster charging the one time $47K fee but in the long run it doesn’t make financial sense to me.

      I was told that most of the sites are managed by Qwantify.

      As such employees are still needed to manage the sites for a client regardless if whether the site is managed by Qwantify for Qwantify or by Qwantify for a client.

      So the question comes back to as a company why would I choose to earn a profit of $37,680 per year on a Qwantify client managed account and still need to pay an employee to manage the account instead of earning $136,800 and still need to pay an employee to manage the site?

      As I stated before, in the long run this model doesn’t not make business sense to me.

      Reply
      1. BJ

        I think in the long run charging 47k per person makes more sense than developing 10 sites a month and paying employees a degree-based salary or hourly income. Remember the average earnings in capital is about 7k per month per website give or take.

        Reply
        1. Anthony Post author

          When Qwantify charges the one time fee of $47,000 there are employees that are still being paid to research the niche, create the site, write content for the site, etc.

          For example I’m going to use your figure of $7,000 which is a much higher figure that what I discussed with them and what I used as my examples in the article.

          However, for the sake of simplicity I’m going go with 10 sites per year.

          10 client sites x $47,000 = $470,000

          Each site takes six months of the twelve month contract to achieve the $10,000 in gross revenue leaving six months remaining.

          10 client sites x $7,000 in monthly profit = $70,000 in net profit per month
          Qwantify residual fee of 10% on the $70,000 in net profit = $7,000 per month.
          6 months remaining on each of the 10 client sites at $7,000 per month per site = $70,000
          Revenue to Qwantify = $540,000.

          What if Qwantify created the same 10 sites for themselves and it took 6 months to get each site to the $10,000 monthly net revenue mark?

          10 sites x $7,000 in monthly profit = $70,000 in net profit per month
          $70,000 x 6 months = $420,000.

          Qwantify owns these 10 sites and the number hold true for the following 12 months.
          10 sites at $7,000 in monthly profit per site x 12 months = $840,000.

          Total profit to Qwantify for 24 months on the same 10 sites = $1,260,000 ($420,000 + $840,000)

          As I was told that most clients remain on after 12 months I’ll take it a step further.

          Qwantify charges $2,000 per month + 10% of the net revenue.
          10 sites x $7,000 per month in net revenue = $70,000 per month x 10% = $7,000 per month.
          10 sites x $2,000 monthly managed fee = $20,000 per month.
          Qwantify total of $27,000 per month x 12 months = $324,000.

          From a purely business and financial perspective why would I choose to earn $324,000 when I could earn $840,000. For every 10 sites I created for others I’m losing $516,000.

          Whether Qwantify is creating sites for clients or themselves employees/contractors still must be paid.

          Reply
          1. BJ

            I’m not understanding your math… Qwantify = $540,000 in one year IF they get 7000 in monthly profit from building 10 websites that make 7000 each per month.

            Or they charge 47000 per person 10 times a month for one year.

            To me a calculator isn’t needed to see the obvious.

            47 a month x10 will always be a lot more than…
            7 a month x10

          2. Anthony Post author

            IF? Is that not the guarantee that Qwantify provides?

            You as the client would be paying Qwantify $47,000 to create the site and get it to the point where the site is generating $10,000 a month in gross revenue.

            If Qwantify is doing it for you that means they can do it for themselves.

            I’ll assume that you’re going into business with Qwantify so that you can have a drop shipping store that will make you money month after month, year after year.

            $47,000 x 10 will always be more than $7,0000 a month x 10 but not in the long run which is the point that I’m attempting to make.

            As a business owner why would I sell “guaranteed” money making sites for a hefty up front price and a percentage of sales when I can do it for myself? Is it because I’m a nice guy?

            I’ll say I have a new product that is making money hand over fist. I’m selling this product and earning a great income.

            Instead of running my business around my new product I go to a person and say,

            “I have this product that I markup 50% and make $125 per sale. I’m selling 1,000 units per month and it costs me $25 to market every sale. I make a profit of $100 per sale at 1,000 units for a net income of $100,000 per month.

            However, give me $50,000 right now and I’ll just keep a $10 royalty per sale.”

            Does the above make any sense to you?

          3. BJ

            Now let’s consider the cost of that 47k in a relatable way. You don’t need to know how much Keith profits from that 47k. When you go to KFC, you might see one worker out of five. However, each worker may be doing more than one job task, and they each serve more than one customer.

            He might have one worker working on 5 websites a month. Yet that one worker would get paid not per website built because that’s Keith’s overall wages. He owns each piece food on that kfc menu.

            Keith will always make the most revenue, no matter how you spin it. He expects his chicken and his girlfriend workers not to cost him or everyone loses.

          4. Anthony Post author

            I’m sorry but you the point you’re attempting to make seems illogical to me.

            If he has one worker working on 5 sites that increases his profit margin per site.

            If I had a site that made a profit of $84,000 per year I would sell it like everyone else sells a profitable site, at a 2.5% multiple or $210,000.

            Why sell the site for $47,000 and a percentage of sales for 1 year?

      2. BJ

        Why not make someone else rich if at the same time they can make you rich/er? Win-Win karma. I don’t think Keith is the Mother Teresa Rarj or anyone else may or may not be promoting him as. I think he is too down-to-earth casual in the way he talks to clients, more like he acts like himself as he would amongst friends than in a business meeting is what I mean.

        Reply
        1. Anthony Post author

          I really hate to say this but I feel I must. When I spoke to Rarj he told me about the company philosophy of karma. I spent a decade in sales and know a sales line when I hear one.

          I’m I big believe in karma which is why I operate this blog in the way that I do. I don’t do it for money I do it to help people and I do it for free.

          If it were truly about karma why not make the fee much less expensive?

          Why not $5,000, $10,000 or even $25,000?

          Reply
          1. BJ

            Like I said, I don’t think Keith is Mother Theresa. O also think it would be suspicious to buy something so high in value for so low an amount. It happens, but usually when someone else pays for it, like a 100k house for 20k because it foreclosed after the owner put 80k down.

            Keith sees value in himself, so he has self-worth, which tells me he has confidence. You can put down 20k, but you need to take out a loan for his full value or rather for your 100k house.

            If Keith sees more value lowering his price to gain more customers in order to sell more houses at 80k, then he probably would at some point. I don’t want him to be a mongul who sells houses at 5k because his housing market value is expected to appreciate the average 5% when indeed it depreciates because of how bad his housing is.

          2. Anthony Post author

            I feel as if you and I are going around and around in one big circle.

            The purpose of this article was to assist people researching a relationship with Qwantify. To assist people by asking questions that I had asked that they made not have thought about asking.

            We can go on and on for days, back and forth, with neither of us doing anything more than becoming more passionate about our points of view.

            You’ve already chosen to go into business with Qwantify and I wish you nothing but success.

            Please keep in touch and let us all know how this works out for you.

  3. BJ

    I’m not sure if you calculated your math correctly. I do know from one recommendation that the contract to have Qwantify continue making your website is optional. So you could make the 100k a year instead of the 45k a year. Honestly I always assumed Keith was making websites for other people because it is a smart business plan. He can make more money charging 47k a month per person for his goal of 10 ppl per month vs making ten websites a month paying 150 people or even 5 ppl per month. Plus, Qwantify still makes websites for themselves. I’m guessing it’s because the goal of ten people per month doesn’t always work out. Plus, they are not 100% 100% of the time. I’m in process with them right now in building my website. So maybe we should keep in post, haha.

    Reply
    1. Anthony Post author

      The contract is for 12 months. At the end of the 12 months you as the client have the option to have Qwantify continue to develop and manage your site. Qwantify needs to be 100%, 100% of the time…that is why clients choose to get into business with them…for the $10K a month guarantee on minimum revenue.

      Please let me know how your site works out with Qwantify.

      Reply
    2. Ronnie F.

      B.J. I am in the beginning stages and would love to know how things will go for your site. Please keep us up to date on a real clients process and income with Qwantify. I’m hesitant on spending 47k and not knowing when I will see a return. I appreciate your input so far and I look forward to your updates.

      Reply
  4. BJ

    I tried what you did to verify what Rarj said to verify if Qwantify created 150 websites. However, I can’t verify what either of you said about not creating or having created 150 websites. I pasted in the number 1-888-572-1511 in Google after confirming it was the same number in the website examples they emailed me and compared it to the list of websites they sent me. However, after searching with that number in Google I found that not all of them from the examples they sent me could be found using that number! So I can’t confirm that they haven’t created 150 websites. I am doing the study courses, and I think that not finding all of their sites through that number might have something to do with how the website creators set up key words and phrases to help people find their site using Google AdWords. I will make sure they add that phone number for mine in the search.

    byebyehairs was the one I couldn’t find with that number.

    Reply
    1. Anthony Post author

      Qwantify doesn’t optimize their sites for organic search. As such there are no key words or key phrases for Google AdWords as all that is done within AdWords for pay per click campaigns.

      I found byebyehairs.com on page 2 of Google under the customer service number. ByeByeHairs.com on Google

      Reply
  5. BJ

    No, my bad. Google Ads… XD I need to keep studying.

    I meant Google Analytics, not AdWords. Can’t edit 🙁

    Reply
    1. Anthony Post author

      Optimizing a website for key words and phrases is solely done for organic search traffic.

      If you’re going to be basing the entire marketing strategy on Google Ads optimizing for key words and key phrases wouldn’t be done.

      Instead of optimizing the site for organic search traffic you are paying for the site to show up on Google under the search term that you want people to find your site under.

      Google Analytics is a web traffic tool operated by Google that allows you as the site owner to see where your traffic is coming from, the number of unique visitors, bounce rate and your ranking under specific keywords and much more.

      Reply
      1. BJ

        You don’t have to sign the contract to have someone manage the account for you. You can do it yourself is what I’ve been told. And I did not find that website in Google using that phone number. I say for everyone who reads your blog to fact check it by speaking with Rarj to get a list of sites and Googling the number all of their sites use. Then see if if they can find each one from that list with the given number. I did not find all of them that way. I’m still in process with them and so far my page has not been developed enough for me to see it. Keep you posted.

        Reply
        1. Anthony Post author

          Yes, the contract to continue to have Qwantify manage your site after 12 months is optional. However, even if they do what the claim do you feel confident enough to continue to run the site on your own? Especially a site that is not optimized but relies on advertising which is a science all in of itself?

          Forget the sites…how about verifiable financial proof?

          As I mentioned in my article, a company that has well over 100 satisfied clients shouldn’t have issue with getting 5 clients to allow them to show prospective clients how well their sites are doing.

          With regard to Rarj, he seems like a nice enough guy but his job as a salesperson is to sell his product and service.

          Reply
          1. BJ

            Idk if I feel confident enough because I haven’t reached the training stages.

            It’s less about confidence and more about determination this early on. I am about 2.5 months in. I would have nearly completed all my studies if not for the hands-on study module. It’s killing me.

            Qwantify can always help me hire and train people to optimize for me. Maybe I’ll hire someone seasonally if Qwantify recommends it. If I’m determined enough, I’ll do it. If it’s a way to break ceiling barriers, then I might be willing to take the financial risk.

      2. BJ

        Is this your way of saying someone wouldn’t fine a phone number for a website just Googling it because “Optimizing for key words and phrases is solely done for organic search traffic?”

        Reply
        1. Anthony Post author

          There is a specific way to use Google in that manner.

          Simply go to Google, “Phone Number” and search.

          The phone number must be placed in quotation marks as in “888-555-5555”

          It will only work if the site has been crawled at some point.

          Reply
          1. BJ

            I don’t think that’s true. I can’t find my email address if I put it in quotes in Google.

          2. Anthony Post author

            Have you ever publicly posted your email address in a forum, online marketing materials or in an online advertisement?

            If you haven’t the method will not work.

            If I posted a phone number on this blog, in a couple of weeks, the method will allow you to find this site with that number.

    1. Anthony Post author

      “Website Crawling is the automated fetching of web pages by a software process, the purpose of which is to index the content of websites so they can be searched. The crawler analyzes the content of a page looking for links to the next pages to fetch and index”

      Website Crawling

      Reply
      1. Ryan Ellis

        Anthony,

        Thank you for your insightful comments, I am in the beginning stages of speaking with Qwantify. I really appreciate this post, and I am now really leaning towards scam, it honestly doesn’t make sense why they wouldn’t do this all on their own and make all the money themselves. I am very confused with their business model. You make some great points…and thank you.

        Reply
        1. Anthony Post author

          Thank you for the thank you 🙂

          Please let me know how your conversations with them go.

          Reply
  6. Dave

    After reading your article I did some quick digging myself and in my opinion Qwantify is a scam for a couple of reasons:

    01. Many of the reviews are obvious fakes on Trustpilot. For example The one from Pamala Cowherd is a total fake. The photo belongs to this lady: https://www.blogtalkradio.com/stopsugarshock/3

    02. Also they have a number of complaints with the BBB already that are not being resolved.

    Reply
  7. Kelz

    To be honest, these are HUGE red flags.
    Thanks Anthony. I am also in the early stages of assessing this business model, and I was taken aback by their rather suspicious guarantees. They scheduled a follow up call and would email me their marketing content, but tto be honest, I do not wish to part with my 47K 🙂

    I do have a shopify store, and I know that to make that amount of money in revenue, you definitely have to invest tremendously in social media. I searched for ads on the Ads Library for any of their sites. Nothing showed up.

    Thanks for these insights.

    Reply

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